Emotional Selling

The tsunami that hit Japan last week and has affected their nuclear reactors is causing great concern in the stock markets.

The Nikkei dropped 11% a few nights ago. The US markets have dropped 2% this morning (Tuesday as I write this).

Now is the time to determine if you’re gambling or investing?. Is this an emotional sell off or a harbinger of things to come?

I discuss Emotional Selling in my video this week.

TRANSCRIPT:

Good Morning Clients and Friends, Mike Brady here.

This week I want to talk about emotional selling. The tsunami hit Japan late last week. I’m recording this on a Tuesday morning and overnight the Nikkea went down 11%. It is just absolutely getting killed. Our markets have opened up very sharply down. So the question I’m posing is what do you do in a situation like this? If your first inclination whenever a huge catastrophic event happens, and now we’re trying, and looking and waiting for what’s going to happen with these nuclear reactors, is if your first reaction is to sell, “I’ve got to move right to the cash!” Then you might ask yourself, are you gambling or are you investing?

What I look for, and if you watch some of my videos, particularly my beginning of the year video (hopefully, you’ve watched it time and time again, it’s must watch) that we’re looking at months, weeks, and the year, of what the market is doing; the value of it, the quality of the market. Because there always going to be events like Japan right now, is happening. I don’t want to minimize the impact of what is happening there in Japan. Japan is a huge global economic player and what is happening there is absolutely horrific. So please, don’t take this the wrong way- that I’m trying to minimize it.

But I am looking at historically, there have been huge events- in our most recent times, the last 20 years or so, there’s been Gulf War I, there’s been Gulf War II, there’s been 9/11- where the market really went down. When the markets reopened that, you know, the week after, and the quarter ended up being positive; the next quarter after that.

So, you know, the major impact that this is going to have, I don’t know yet. I absolutely acknowledge that I don’t know and anyone who says they absolutely know is pulling your leg.

What I will do is to continue to watch this very closely. I do not get emotional about it. You know, emotional selling I think, doesn’t serve anyone’s best interest. I might change my mind in days, in a week, and in a month. That is why you can’t be beholden to your theory, you know, so very stringently. But you do have to kind of keep a straight arrow. What are you doing? What are the value of the market? What’s the impact going to be, not just the immediate impact but one month, one quarter and one year from now? And, with all the data that I have right now, as it’s being compiled, etc., I’m not convinced that now is the time to sell out. So I’m not doing anything with my portfolios for clients. But you know, I will continue to keep you abreast that’s why I have weekly newsletters so you can know what I’m thinking.

Anyway, I just wanted to kind of touch base on that. Hopefully, you’re getting this video, I’m doing this on a Tuesday morning, getting it a little late to my compliance department. And hopefully they’re really good about getting it turned around so you are getting this on a Wednesday morning. If not, you’re getting it as soon as possible.

So anyway, have a wonderful week.  I’ll keep you informed.

My company is Generosity Wealth Management. I am a registered rep with Cambridge Investment Research. 303.747.6455. I am here in Boulder. If you’re my client, I love you. If you’re not my client, I still like you but I’d love you to be my client. 303.747.6455. Thanks bye bye.



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