Volatility, Healthcare in Retirement

It’s my belief the volatility we’ve seen in the past few weeks, months, and year will continue going forward. I also believe that more active management may make sense to take advantage of this market condition.

I talk about this in my video.

I also discuss the rising healthcare costs in your future and that I have software that will estimate what lump sum you may need upon retirement to fund your healthcare under certain assumptions.

Fun stuff! Click on video to hear more!

TRANSCRIPT:

Hi there, Mike Brady with Generosity Wealth Management, here in Boulder, Colorado. And I am really pleased to be talking with you today and there are a couple of things I want to talk about today.

And the first one is volatility. On Wednesday, we had a DOW that was over 400 points up, and this is following the Thanksgiving week where the market was sharply down. (Low volume but still sharply down.) And it’s my belief that this type of volatility, and not just in the last couple of weeks, we’ve seen a lot of volatility in the last year or so, I believe it is going to continue going forward. And if that is true, it’s also my belief that some active management should be considered for client’s portfolio. That’s something that I’m going to be talking with my clients about in the coming months. That’s also something I’m going to be talking about in these videos in the coming months, that it may have a place in a volatile environment- how can we best position our portfolio to take advantage of that particular market condition? So, if you’re not one of my clients, I recommend you give me a call so that we can talk about it, kind of one on one, and your personal situation.

And the second thing I’m thinking about this week is well, healthcare costs; and specifically as it relates to retirement.

I heard a statistic yesterday that is very interesting. The Fortune 100, 91 out of the Fortune 100, in 1985, had traditional pension plans. Today, the Fortune 100, only 19 of them have traditional pension plans. If you’re a GE employee, starting today, you know, day one of your employment, you are not offered their traditional pension plan. And that is, GE is one of the largest companies, with the largest pension plans. So, I think this is a trend that is going to continue going forward. And what this tells us is that you’ve got to take control of your saving and investing for your own retirement. Don’t assume that someone else, either some big corporation or even Social Security is going to handle it. You’ve got to take control of it!

And one of the largest expenses you’re going to have in retirement are your health care costs. And fifty-three per cent of individuals recently polled couldn’t even estimate what those health care costs are. We’re talking Medicare A, and B, and D, and your estimated premium payments, and your estimated out of pocket expenses. These are some expenses that you’re going to have to, you know, pay in your retirement. So the question is, in your life expectancy, what are they going to be, what kind of a lump sum, under certain assumptions, will you need to have in retirement? And of course the question is- do you have that set aside? You may, you may not, but let’s try to quantify that on a piece of paper.

I have some wonderful software that I’m going to be working with clients with in the next couple of months to try to put that number down on a piece of paper so that we can say, “Boom! This amount of money is what, under these assumptions, we’re going to need for the healthcare costs for the rest of your life.” So the question is, have you done that for yourself? Maybe you have. If you haven’t, give me a call I can try to help you answer that question. It’s a hard number to really put down, things are always in motion, but you know what, let’s try to estimate as best we can. An estimate is better than not having any idea at all. And it is something we can revise as the years go forward.

So anyway, that’s kind of what’s on my mind this week. Mike Brady, Generosity Wealth Management, 303.747.6455, here in Boulder, Colorado. A comprehensive, a full service wealth management firm; I love my clients, I have a great passion to treat my clients like members of my family, and if you’re not my client, I’d love to talk to you about whether it makes sense if what I do is right for you, or if I’m the right person to help you with that. So, anyway, you have a wonderful week and we’ll talk to you later bye bye now.



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