Equity Markets and Gold

The stock markets have been making some headlines recently. Last Friday, the DOW declined below 12,000.

Should you freak out? Is this the beginning of the end?

I also address whether I feel the gold rally will continue. Does it make sense to be a part of your portfolio?

TRANSCRIPT:

Hi Clients and Friends, Mike Brady here.

Just a quick video just to let you know what I’m thinking about this week. And this week I’m thinking about, sort of, the news headlines about the kind of, the steady erosion in the Dow and the stock markets, the equity markets, over the last week and a half to two weeks. The momentum has certainly slowed, but is this something you should freak out about, and completely sell all your stocks, and this is the beginning of the end? I don’t believe so. An official correction in the market is when you hit ten percent, and we have not hit that.

As of the recording of this video it’s down about six and a half percent from its high. And you have to ask yourself if this is, you know, completely impacting your portfolio, maybe you have too much in equities and stocks. So this is a good time to evaluate whether or not you are getting the full force of that, the extent of that decline. And if so, then you probably have too much in your in your, too much equities in your portfolio.

I do believe that diversification is a very key ingredient. The last couple of years we’ve had a pretty strong, upwardly mobile market with a couple of declines here and there; and most notably last summer in July. But pretty much it’s been up, up, up. And so something like this makes great news headlines.

I’ve been asked in the past if I think that gold is a good compliment to your portfolio- and the answer is yes. Gold has had a huge rally over the last few years. And one of the reasons why, there’s three reasons why I think it’s going to continue to be attractive and a nice hedge, a nice part (a relatively small part) but a part of your portfolio.

Number one is I think low real interest rates world-wide still make it attractive. I mean, real interest rate means what you are getting after inflation. So if your rate of return is five percent and inflation is four, then your real rate of return is the difference which is one percent.

The second reason why gold is going to be attractive is some fiscal concerns, highlighted in you know, continued fiscal deficits. And so, I think this is something that is a real concern and what makes gold a little bit more attractive.

The third thing is just emerging market economics. It becomes, as emerging markets world-wide, globally, people…, it becomes commodity driven, and people in those areas do want some gold and some inflationary…some protection against inflationary pressures.

I think of, whenever you’re looking at which asset class to go towards, whether or not it’s stocks or bonds or gold, or whatever it might be; it’s like a beauty contest. It’s not always what you think is the most beautiful but you have to think about what everyone else thinks is the most beautiful. And I do think that gold is something that everyone finds very attractive. And so we always have to evaluate do they still think it’s attractive? And we have to be smarter than them about that.

It’s the same way with the momentum of the equity markets, the bond markets, whatever it might be. And so, I think that this summer it is going to be choppy as it relates to the equity and the stock markets. We’ll continue to evaluate that. Do people, getting back to my analogy of the beauty contest, do people still think that it’s attractive? But I think, you know, some of the profitability of the underlying balance sheets of corporations etc., make it attractive to me, and I have to continue to watch to make sure that it’s attractive for other people, to other people, if they are seeing it the same way that I’m seeing it.

So anyway, that’s, those are my thoughts. That’s it for this week. My name is Mike Brady, my company is Generosity Wealth Management. I am a, kind of a holistic comprehensive approach with clients, with their financial well-being. Give me a call, 303.747.6455. I am a registered representative with Cambridge Investment Research. You have a wonderful week and I’ll talk to you next week. Bye bye now.

 

 

 

 



The information being provided is strictly as a courtesy. Our company makes no representation as to the completeness or accuracy of information provided at these sites. Nor is the company liable for any direct or indirect technical or system issues or any consequences arising out of your access to or your use of third-party technologies, sites, information and programs made available through this site. When you access one of these sites, you assume total responsibility and risk for your use of the sites you are visiting.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average is an unmanaged, price-weighted index of 30 large capitalization stocks with dividends reinvested.

The Standard & Poor’s 500 Index (“S&P 500”) is an unmanaged, market capitalization weighted index of 500 widely held stocks, with dividends reinvested, and is often used as a proxy for the stock market.

The Nasdaq Composite is an unmanaged, market capitalization weighted index of stocks listed on the Nasdaq Stock Exchange, and are reported as price return without reinvestment of dividends.

Indexes are often used as a proxy for the stock market and cannot be invested in directly.