Bumpy Ride for Treasuries

Bonds go up and down in value based on interest rates, credit quality, and simple supply/demand.

The first quarter was a bumpy ride for US Treasuries (as I mention in my video which you should have listened to already), and essentially ended flat to slightly negative.

Much of what will happen in the next quarter will be dependent on the ending of quantitative easing in June and whether the Federal Reserve increases interest rates.

What to do? Stay tuned and be diversified. Too much of an allocation to any category can be negative. Too many Treasuries may lead you to lose purchasing power because you’re not staying up with inflation.

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