Life Expectancy and Costs

Life Expectancy and Costs

Do you know your life expectancy?  What does life expectancy really mean, and why should we care?

 These are the questions I answer in my video this newsletter.

Therefore, you should watch my video.

Hi there, Mike Brady with Generosity Wealth Management, a comprehensive, full service, wealth management firm headquartered here in Boulder, Colorado. Today I want to talk about life expectancy and withdrawals and Medicare and Social Security, etc. To be honest with you I only have three or four minutes so I’m only going to give you a little teaser and then I’m going to follow up in the next video.

The first one is life expectancy. If you are 65; I’m going to put up on the chart there, on the video, a chart. What you’ll see if you are 65 years old and you are a woman you have an 85% probability of living up to age 75. That’s a high probability of course. If a couple that are 65 years old the probability of one of you living past 75 is almost assured at 97%. We go out to 80, 85, 90. Let’s just look at 90 years old; if you’re 60 years old, from 75, 85, that’s 25 years to age 90. If you are a woman you have a 1 in 3 chance of living to 90. Periodically I’ll meet with someone who will say; well you know my mother and father they died in their early 80s and there’s no way I’m going to live to 90. Well, you know what, there’s a 1 in 3 chance that you will. Do you want to be that one and spend all your money in the next 25 years? Probably not; plus, many times our parents, that’s just kind of the way it worked. That generation they were smoking and drinking and all kinds of stuff and now we’re always eating kale and gluten free stuff so chances are we’re probably going to live a little bit longer. That’s what statistics have shown us.

One of the values that a financial advisor brings and I always bring to the relationship with clients is life expectancy, that’s usually; if my life expectancy is 85 or so I’ve got to make sure that I plan for much longer than that because that’s using the average. I think that chart there starts to show it. The reason why I bring that up is in retirement; I’m now going to throw one more chart up there for today and what you’re going to see is extending my age and category. From left to right it adds up to about 100%, some rounding and stuff like that, but the gray is the 10 years leading up to retirement at age 65. Then you hit 65 and then above. What you’re going to see is some housing and other increases as a percentage. Transportation goes down. Medical care of course goes up, etc. What we’re going to see on the bottom there is the average inflation from 1982 to 2013 of those particular categories. You’re going to see the medical care which is a higher percentage has a tendency to increase. You know this; you’ve been paying attention the last five years and I’m stating the obvious. Other things; housing is still almost 3%. The percentage of; the items that seem to go up as a percentage of your income also has some high inflation to it as well. That’s something that we have to keep in consideration. We live longer than what we think we’re going to do and many times things are more expensive than what we think as well.

Gosh, do I have time for one more really cool thing here? Here is the variation in healthcare cost. See that little graph there, the little United States there? What you’re going to see is the annual Medicare cost and in Colorado we’re right in the middle. We’re not on the cheap side like many of the world in blue, we’re between $3750 and $4500 and then $4500 after that entry has to do with those with traditional Medicare and comprehensive Medicare depending on where you live in retirement. We’re going to talk a little bit more at another video of some long-term planning, withdrawal strategies. One of the things that a financial advisor brings to the relationship are all the strategies about the de-accumulation of the portfolio; you’ve got the accumulation stage where you’re trying to save money and 401(k) all this type of stuff and then you hit a point and then it’s the de-accumulation. What’s your strategy? What’s your mix? How can you set things up to limit, to make the probability that you’ll outlive your money as low as possible because that’s of course a bad thing. These are some of the things I’m going to talk about in upcoming videos. Nice to talk to you today, sorry it’s so short but I did want to be short and pippy.

Mike Brady, 303-747-6455.

You have a great day.

 

Warren Buffet’s Biggest Losses

Warren Buffet’s Biggest Losses

2014 06 25 Berkshire Hathaway- losses since 1980

When you hear 9 – 10% in the stock market, you must remember that those returns contain every single type of market environment.

Warren Buffet is one of the most successful investors ever, and he still has declines at some point.  But, he has the right behaviors ingrained in him to “be greedy when others are fearful, and fearful when others are greedy”.

No one likes declines, but they are part of a full market cycle.  When constructing a portfolio for a client, I always try to understand the risk tolerance for them, understanding that unless you’re 100% invested in the stock market, you won’t get 100% of the ups (desired) and downs (undesirable) of that market

Here’s a full article with thoughts from Warren:

Warren Buffet’s Biggest Losses

8 Notable Price Points Adjusted for Inflation

8 Notable Price Points Adjusted for Inflation

2014 06 25 6 million dollar man edit

Somehow the $28,852,576.06 Man just doesn’t have the same ring to it, but that’s what it would be in 2014 with inflation.

Inflation is a real thing, even if it’s been incredibly low as of late.  With quantitative easing and a zero interest rate policy by the Fed, it’s actually been unusually low and for a sustained time frame.

I think it’s reasonable to expect inflation in the future, whether that’s 2, 5, or 10 years.  

There are some investments that are less interest rate and inflation sensitive than others, so keep that in mind when crafting a well diversified portfolio.  If you have questions about your portfolio, I’m just a phone call away.

Full Article

Most Efficient, Groundbreaking Way to Hold a Hamburger

Most Efficient, Groundbreaking Way to Hold a Hamburger

2014 06 25 hamburger

Like investment theories, there are different philosophies on the best way to hold a hamburger for maximum efficiency.

Hey, I’m an efficiency fanatic and need to know these things.

So, researchers spent 4 months (experts in fluid mechanics, engineering, and dentistry) to figure out the best way eat a large hamburger.  It included a 3D scan of the hamburger to study how the particles interacted together.

Now that I’ve teased you, click on the link to watch the 1:26 video with the answer.

Most Efficient Way to Hold a Hamburger